The Land Report

2018.4

The Magazine of the American Landowner is an essential guide for investors, landowners, and those interested in buying or selling land. The award-winning quarterly is known for its annual survey of America's largest landowners, The Land Report 100.

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100 e Land Report they established a base of operations on ranches in Shackelford, Haskell, and Throckmorton counties. In 1884, they incorporated at the First National Bank in Albany. In 1895, they acquired 232,000 acres in Jeff Davis County on which they established the renowned LONG X RANCH. To this day, the brothers' heirs and descendants still own ranches in Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Montana, and North Dakota. 54/ Sanders Family 250,000 ACRES The Sanders's ROARING SPRINGS RANCH ranks as one of the largest cow-calf operations in Southeast Oregon. The Sanders's commitment to environmental stewardship saw them develop an innovative program of native plant nutrition rather than relying on more traditional commercial feeding solutions. Their support of various conservation initiatives such as improving wildlife habitats and restoring upland watershed health has garnered the family praise at local, state, and federal levels. 51/ Coffee Family 256,000 ACRES Siblings Caren Coffee and Bill Coffee, whose forebears include Montana Rodeo Hall of Famer C.M. Coffee, own the COFFEE CATTLE COMPANY outside of Miles City, Montana, with additional properties in Custer and Rosebud counties. Both siblings are active in the financial sector; Bill is chairman and CEO of Stockman Bank while Caren serves as the director of Stockman Financial Corp. 52/ Jones Family 255,000 ACRES Arriving in Texas in 1826, A.C. Jones would conquer war, disease, rattlesnakes, vermin, and some very inhospitable terrain to create a network of ranches that includes the 34,000-acre ALTA VISTA RANCH. Son William Whitby Jones worked as a hand on cattle drives that reached into Kansas before assuming responsibility for the family enterprise. His grandson A.C. "Dick" Jones IV runs Jones Ranch's cattle operations today. 52/ True Family 255,000 ACRES This Wyoming-based family owns pipeline, trucking, drilling, and other businesses related to oil and gas, but the mainstay of the operation remains TRUE RANCHES. Established in 1957, True Ranches includes seven ranches in Eastern Wyoming that raise Angus, Black Baldy, Charolais, and Hereford. In May, Dave True was elected president of the University of Wyoming Board of Trustees. 54/ Reynolds Family 250,000 ACRES In the years following the Civil War, the Reynoldses began ranching along the Clear Fork of the Brazos River near Fort Griffin, Texas. Brothers George Thomas and William David Reynolds teamed up and registered the Long X brand together. The two cowmen began running their herds in the Davis Mountains of Far West Texas and north to Wyoming, Utah, Montana, Nebraska, the Dakotas, and Canada. Thanks to their ultimate success, 56/ Paul Fireman 247,500 ACRES In 1979, Fireman paid $65,000 to acquire the US distribution rights to a boutique brand of British running shoes named after a small South African antelope. Twenty-six years later, he sold Reebok International (which he had bought outright in 1984) to rival Adidas for $3.8 billion. Clearly, the Massachusetts native has an eye for value. He has applied the same skill set to Nevada's historic WINECUP GAMBLE RANCH. Established in 1868, the Western landmark had suffered from decades of mismanagement. Fireman purchased it in 1993 for $7 million and has subsequently returned it to top form as a large-scale commercial cattle operation using the same tried-and-true lessons he applied to Reebok. This renaissance is a casebook study of astute investment, leadership development, and team building. Paul Fireman's Winecup Gamble Ranch runs 51 miles east to west and 46 miles north to south. 122 L ANDREP ORT.COM e LandReport | WINTER 20 18

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