The Land Report

FALL 2015

The Magazine of the American Landowner is an essential guide for investors, landowners, and those interested in buying or selling land. The award-winning quarterly is known for its annual survey of America's largest landowners, The Land Report 100.

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By Henry Chappell Photography by Wyman Meinzer Wild Man Wyman Meinzer is the ultimate outdoorsman, a throwback to a day and age when hardy Americans not only knew how to live off the land but earned their daily bread doing so. I could write a book about Wyman Meinzer. The truth is, I've collaborated on four books with the guy, and I'm taking a break from our fifth to pen this profile. You might expect me to start off by telling you when I met him or where I met him or how I met him, but I think it best to begin by telling you when I first learned of this wild man. In the early 1980s, I was stuck behind a desk holding down a corporate job in Dallas. Like a lot of jobs in gilded cages, the pay was good. But I spent a fair amount of time daydreaming about the great outdoors. Subscriptions to Field & Stream, Outdoor Life, and Sports Afield stoked this fever. Come hunting season, my idea of a great weekend was to load my dogs in the truck, drive all night, and arrive in the field by sunup. One day back then, I was paging through American Hunter and started reading about this guy from another era. Like me, he had a college degree, but instead of wasting away in an office, he went off and spent several winters trapping coyotes and bobcats in the Big Empty, that immense swath of West Texas that is home to iconic ranches such as the Waggoner, the Four Sixes, and the Pitchfork. I can't tell you how many times I read that article, savoring each photo and every word. Turns out his name was Wyman Meinzer. Wyman Meinzer does more than study the ways of the Old West. The State Photographer of Texas regularly field-tests them, braving winter's bite with a bison hide (opposite) or handcrafting an honest-to-goodness dugout in the side of a creek bank. Turn to page 86 to read the epic story of the Antler Creek Dugout. 68 The LandReport | FA L L 2 0 1 5 LANDREPORT.COM

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