The Land Report

Rockies 2018

The Magazine of the American Landowner is an essential guide for investors, landowners, and those interested in buying or selling land. The award-winning quarterly is known for its annual survey of America's largest landowners, The Land Report 100.

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R O C K I E S 2 0 1 8 | The LandReport 35 LANDREPORT.COM I n a curious incident of statehood, most states west of the Mississippi River received grants of federal land to assist in the funding of public education and other programs. Known variously as school lands, trust lands, or grant lands, these properties are managed by agencies called land offices, land commissions, or land boards. There are approximately 46 million acres of state trust lands nationwide. The lion's share — more than 40 million acres or approximately 85 percent of this total —is concentrated in nine Western states: Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. Because of state trust lands' prove- nance, the public does not necessarily enjoy access to these lands for recreational uses as they do BLM, national forests, or national parks. Instead, they benefit the public by the revenues they generate. The management of state trust lands focuses primarily on generating revenues via livestock grazing and the lease and sale of natural resources such as timber, coal, and oil and gas. The rules and regulations applicable to state trust lands have changed significantly over the years and can vary not only from state to state but also with the different federal land management agencies. The good news is that these permits tend to have many similarities with the BLM's. SHUTTERSTOCK STATE TRUST LANDS. Also known as school lands or grant lands, these 40-plus million acres were deeded to Western states by the federal government to benefit public schools. Since their purpose is not recreation but to generate revenues for education, state trust lands are not as "public" as other government lands. Instead, they are typically leased for grazing, forestry, or mineral extraction. Prior to founding Mirr Ranch Group, Ken Mirr worked as a public lands attorney and assisted ranchers, ski areas, natural resource companies, conservation groups, and others with transactions involving federal and state land agencies. e Denver-based broker won 2015 Ranchland Deal of the Year honors for the sale of Colorado's JE Canyon Ranch. Because of state trust lands' provenance, the public does not necessarily enjoy access to these lands for recreational uses as they do BLM, national forests, or national parks. Instead, they benefit the public by the revenues they generate.

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